What you do in your house is worth as much as if you did it up in heaven for our Lord God. We should accustom ourselves to think of our position and work as sacred and well-pleasing to God, not on account of the position and work, but on account of the word and faith from which the obedience and the work flow. ~ Martin Luther

Monday, April 28, 2014

Spring Fencing

 
 
 


Though the weekend was a bit stormy, we were able to begin the first big project of the year~ fencing off pasture ground.  Matt had split the fence posts several weeks ago, using as much locust as he could find and supplementing the last of it with soft maple.  Soft maple won't last as long as locust, so I am told, so we kept the soft maple toward the back of the pasture, in the wooded area.  We'll have to replace them sooner but they will work for a few years, anyway.





I have to say, I upped the ante of 'farm girl' status by running the post pounder.  That thing was scary.  I was SKEER-ED.  Imagine a metal beam slamming down at you full throttle just inches away from your precious hand and then landing with a huge BANG, shoving the post deep into the ground.  It was THAT CLOSE to doing that to my hand.  And then imagine doing it about 4-5 times per post... for over a hundred posts.  Yeah.  This is my lot in life.

And that face up there? Only one of the many facial contortions I mustered throughout the ordeal and by far the least impressive.







Andrew, too, felt pretty empowered when he was able to drive the truck with posts through the field.



8 year old boys like that sort of thing.



It was difficult to decide where to put the pasture.  It seemed silly to put it across the road from the barn since we'll have to be hauling animals twice a day across the road.  But then again, the only running water source (a creek) happens to be BEHIND the house and to put the pasture there means not having to haul 20+ gallons of water a day to thirsty animals in the summertime.  Eventually, Matt just put some posts in the ground and there was no going back.

I don't really prefer the pasture fence being so up close to the house.  I call it the 'prison fence'.  Matt says I have come a long way~ from being a 'city girl' to feeling claustrophobic and boxed in by a pasture.  But there it is. 

I hope to eventually get used to it. 


 


In the meantime, two sides of the pasture are lined with fence posts.  Two more sides to go.  And then Penny (our Jersey) and Skeeter (our mini dwarf horse) can roam free as birds. 

Or as free as Jerseys and dwarf-horses.

May my fingers and hands stay firmly intact throughout the remainder of this pasture project. 

5 comments:

Bobbi Anderson said...

So exciting!!!! How neat to see your hopestead dreams become a reality!!! And I grew up riding horses, but now I live in the city (random background) so a fence with animals right up next to a farm house sounds so peaceful and dreamy!!! My city neighbors tend not to be so peaceful. ;) but we must grow where God plants us!

Miranda Hupp said...

How incredibly fun and scary!

Amanda said...

I love "fixing fence". There's just something about it. Its such hard work and yet so long-lasting and tangible. Good job!functions

Terri Cheney said...

lol love you feeling hemmed in! I get claustrophobic when I see how close homes are in town...I notice there are perks to being the post'er' girl. wink!

beth said...

how adorable are you?! seriously.

God bless your fingers. oh, please take care of those talented hands.