What you do in your house is worth as much as if you did it up in heaven for our Lord God. We should accustom ourselves to think of our position and work as sacred and well-pleasing to God, not on account of the position and work, but on account of the word and faith from which the obedience and the work flow. ~ Martin Luther

Tuesday, August 17, 2010

For a...Smooch


I finished up the project I wrote about here.

I had intended this sweater to be for a boy, but hey, I might use it for a girl as well. Loved the teal color and, turns out to have a few very light purple hues~so it could work. How cute would a wee little lass be with a teal and brown polka dot bow in her hair to match?!?!


Went to buy some matching buttons for it (and about swallowed my tongue at the prices of buttons!) and then remembered about the button box recently acquired by Aunt Nancy. They aren't the most lovely buttons in the world, but I think they suit it just the same. And they were free.

Gotta remember that button bin in the future. (Don't think it will be too hard to remember now that I know the price of buttons!)


For all you knit/crocheters out there, I have a question: I have heard of something called "blocking". Is this important? Is the shaping permanent? How is it done? I did notice the brown lining looks slightly cockeyed and wondered if blocking would help? Just curious.

8 comments:

Nanci said...

Rebecca,

The acrylic, polyester (and even certain wool yarns of today don't usually need blocked like the wool yarns of yesteryear did. Blocking was usually done before pieces were sewn together. They were wet, and laid out flat (usually pinned to a padded board until dry) to keep the pieces straight and to prevent shrinkage.

As far as being permanent, I don't see it could have been. I seem to have some memories of my mother blocking completed sweaters, etc. on our dining room table in a similar manner after each laundering.

I don't believe it would help the edging to lay flatter. Sometime if you omit of few of the sc along the edge that will do the trick.

Actually, the edging really doesn't look off to me. In fact, it looks to me like you did a wonderful job!!!

Bonnie said...

Bee-yu-ti-ful! Yes, a polka-dot bow would be darling...
I think the buttons work well for a boy, maybe changing them to lavender if Smooch is a girl. Just a thought.

Lana said...

adorable! I think I'm gonna buy some yarn and make the bigger size for my little boy's birthday comin up in october!

Riahli said...

Wow, how cute!! Great job! :)

Amanda said...

As Nanci said, blocking will only work on wool or other natural fibers. You typically block the pieces before sewing them together. Not only does this even out stitching and such, but it also makes the seaming process easier. It is not permanent. Each time the garment is laundered, it must be blocked again. However, subsequent blockings are usually much easier; i.e., you don't use pins, you just lay it out and kinda pull it out to the desired measurements.

Amanda said...

(Sorry, just subbing!)

Tracy said...

So, the sweater was pretty easy? I'm wanting a fairly quick gift for a baby being born in September.

Kim said...

Beautiful sweater! And YES you can block acrylic and it would fix your edging nicely. :)
Here's a link to a great article for you. Hope it helps. :)

http://beadknitter.blogspot.com/2009/03/you-can-block-acrylic.html